2018 Review of the Year

Well, that’s another year over, so it’s time for my traditional ranking of all the new releases I saw in the past twelve months. I find that the only way I can ever actually finish these lists is if I just post the list, with pictures, and no explanations why. If there’s a particular placing that’s puzzles you, ask in the comments, and remember, I’m in the UK, so not all these films may be considered 2018 releases for you, but they are for me. As such, Paddington 2 isn’t on here, but it’d be pretty darn close to #1. Here’s my list:
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My Week in Movies, 2015 Week 18

These past few weeks I’ve been getting seriously behind on all my targets for the year. Then last week we got a puppy and it looked like everything would just get worse. Then this week happened. Oh what a glorious week it has been! You see, I pulled the short straw of puppy ownership by taking the first week off work to look after little Murphy but, it turns out, the little fella likes to sleep a whole darn lot. Yes there’s been far more urine on various floor-like surfaces than usual, and yes there are teeth and claw marks in my arms, hands and soul, but I’ve spent a great deal of these past few days sat in front of my television, my laptop or both. And then on top of that the week ends with a three-day weekend (after my one day in work, tagging my partner in for a little light poop-a-scooping), during which my partner takes Murphy up to see her folks, leaving me with the house to myself and those aforementioned screens. Hence, I got a lot done. How much? Well why don’t you take a glance southwards and find out.┬áHere’s what I watched this week: Continue reading

A Star is Born (1954)

Norman Maine (James Mason) is a world-renowned movie star who has it all, including a crippling drinking problem. His latest drunken antics see him disrupting a variety show he was supposed to be appearing at, and he finds himself dancing on stage with Esther Blodgett (Judy Garland), who was singing and dancing whilst accompanied by the Glenn Miller Orchestra. Esther has the wherewithal to turn Norman’s clowning into a comedic routine, and something inside of her catches the actor’s eye. Later that night, when his stupor has slightly worn off and he is scouring his regular haunts for a lady to take home for the evening (or rather, early morning by that point), there’s only one girl in Norman’s head. He finds Esther singing with the band at a deserted club, and offers her the opportunity of a lifetime; if she quits the band the next day, he’ll give her a shot at the big-time and make her a star.
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