My Week in Movies, 2018 Weeks 2-5

Isn’t this going well? I successfully managed to keep up my regular weekly posts for a grand total of one whole entire week before failing miserably. In my defence, it’s been a busy period, with Aisha off gallivanting around the world on business (specifically Arizona and Germany), leaving me to look after not just our dog but also her parents’ cockapoo puppy (her favourite thing: waking me up by jumping on me in bed and cleaning out my ears with her tongue, also urinating in my office, the only room we’ve re-carpeted since moving in) and walking our neighbour’s god every day. Regardless, normality has now resumed so I get on with covering four weeks worth of movies, a time period that has included me attempting to hit some of the bigger Oscar nominees in response to the nominations announcement (WHERE IS THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE? WHERE? I WILL NOT STAND FOR THIS AGAIN! THE OSCARS ARE DEAD TO ME!) as well as watching almost every M. Night Shyamalan movie in preparation for the regrettable decision to host a retrospective podcast on him. So, let’s get on with it, shall we? Here’s all the movies I’ve watched recently:
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The 10 Best Superhero Movies of All Time Blog Relay

Two blog relays in a matter of weeks? Yep. This time around the topic at hand is superhero movies, which is only fitting seeing as it was created by Lambcast-regular and host of the FilmWhys podcast (upon which I’ve appeared no less than three times so far) Bubbawheat from Flights, Tights and Movie Nights. The aim of this quest is to determine the best 10 superhero movies of all time. Here are the rules, as defined on Bubbawheat’s original post: Continue reading

Unbreakable

Unbreakable is essentially an anti-superhero movie, taking many of the genres staples and applying them to a real-life thriller, years before Christopher Nolan rebooted the Batman franchise with his realistic and plausible worldview. The hero, David Dunn (Bruce Willis) has alliterative initials (Bruce Banner/Peter Parker/Clark Kent), wears a hooded cloak and has a penchant for posing in the rain with a bright light behind him, illuminating a stark silhouette on the screen, yet unlike most comic book heroes, when he tries to chat up a girl (after slyly removing his wedding ring) the attempt fails. That never happened to Tony Stark.  The film is even shot like a comic book, with the aforementioned chat up routine swaying from person to person between seats on a train, and many scenes utilising one bright colour, such a bright orange boiler suit, contrasting against the surrounding dreary muted blacks, browns and greys.
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